Industrial Copper Macramé Plant Hangers

When we were looking for a new home for our growing family one thing we for sure didn’t want was a cookie cutter home. We wanted somewhere with personality and unique detailing. So when we found or home which was built over 100 years ago, we knew it would be perfect. Although as much as we love all the strange detailing, a few things have been harder to personalize because nothing in this home is industry-standard sized, or even straight for that matter!!

This indoor window was one that we had no idea what to do with. One standing discussion with Matt, the other half of Tall Dork and Matching, was that we needed more texture and greenery in our living area. So this is what we came up with, we hope you enjoy!   We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.This indoor window was one that we had no idea what to do with. One standing discussion with Matt, the other half of Tall Dork and Matching, was that we needed more texture and greenery in our living area. So this is what we came up with, we hope you enjoy!

We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.

Plant Hanger

Things you’ll need for the hanger:

– Copper pipe (any width)

– 2x pipe bracket (make sure it fits the width of your copper pipe)

– Measuring tape

– Pipe cutter

– 8x screws

– Electric drill

We started by measuring the width of where we wanted to have our copper pipe - making sure we measured exactly at the height we wanted, because nothing this house is level or even! We used a pipe cutter to cut the copper pipe to size and drilled the pipe bracket (floor flange) to the walls and inserted the pipe.

We started by measuring the width of where we wanted to have our copper pipe – making sure we measured exactly at the height we wanted, because nothing this house is level or even! We used a pipe cutter to cut the copper pipe to size and drilled the pipe bracket (floor flange) to the walls and inserted the pipe.

Once we had our “plant hanger” installed it was time to work on the pots and adding texture. We found pots in the size we wanted and rope from the dollar store which was way less pricey than the hardware stores.    Rope Textured Pots and Macramé hangers    Things you’ll need for the pots and hanger:    - 7 pots (or however many you need to fill your space)  - Glue gun and glue sticks  - Rust-oleum chalk paint (I used linen white but decided what color works best in the space you’re creating for!)  - Chalk paint brush (any paint brush will do, this one is just easier and I had one kicking around)  - Rope for the pots (you can use this technique on any width of rope that calls to you)  - Painter’s tape  - Macramé cord (any thickness)  - Measuring tape

Once we had our “plant hanger” installed it was time to work on the pots and adding texture. We found pots in the size we wanted and rope from the dollar store which was way less pricey than the hardware stores.

Rope Textured Pots and Macramé hangers

Things you’ll need for the pots and hanger:

– 7 pots (or however many you need to fill your space)

– Glue gun and glue sticks

– Rust-oleum chalk paint (I used linen white but decided what color works best in the space you’re creating for!)

– Chalk paint brush (any paint brush will do, this one is just easier and I had one kicking around)

– Rope for the pots (you can use this technique on any width of rope that calls to you)

– Painter’s tape

– Macramé cord (any thickness)

– Measuring tape

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The wrapping took way more time than we anticipated so we watched an episode of Brooklyn 99 per pot to keep me set on my goal! So settle in and enjoy some Netflix while you craft away.  Here is a video of how Abby wrapped the rope around the pots to create that texture!The wrapping took way more time than we anticipated so we watched an episode of Brooklyn 99 per pot to keep me set on my goal! So settle in and enjoy some Netflix while you craft away.

Once they were all wrapped we decided to paint the bottom few inches white for a few reasons.

1.    The pots we bought were brightly coloured, which didn’t really fit our aesthetic.

2.    Adding some white makes the green pop and makes the brown less overwhelming.

3.    Taking the dollar store stickers off the bottoms of these is impossible! Instant fix is to just paint over them!

We also varied how much white we used. If they all had different amounts of white, we wouldn’t have to measure! Which we do not care for.

We used painters tape to tape off how much we wanted to be white and used Rust-Oleum’s Chalk Paint in Linen White. It’s a soft white and also it adheres to virtually anything so we didn’t have to worry about priming the surface at all. We will do anything to be efficient….That’s my self-care way of calling us lazy!

We did 3 very thin coats so it would go on smooth and even. On the metal bottom we painted in round strokes with the chalk paint brush. On the rope parts we used the same brush but patted the brush on as if we was sponge painting.  Macramé Time! While we left the pots to dry we started on my macramé. Matt’s parents recently imparted their ‘70s decorating skills on us and taught us how to do it!  We used a basic Lark’s-head knot to attach the macramé cord to the copper pipe. We then used a series of square knots coming down to add interest and texture, alternating the amount of knots. You can do however many knots you want depending on the area you are filling in.  Here’s a quick video of how Abby did the knots. Sorry it’s so fast! She's no pro at macramé but YouTube has many great links that will slow it down for you!We did 3 very thin coats so it would go on smooth and even. On the metal bottom we painted in round strokes with the chalk paint brush. On the rope parts we used the same brush but patted the brush on as if we was sponge painting.

Macramé Time! While we left the pots to dry we started on my macramé. Matt’s parents recently imparted their ‘70s decorating skills on us and taught us how to do it!

We used a basic Lark’s-head knot to attach the macramé cord to the copper pipe. We then used a series of square knots coming down to add interest and texture, alternating the amount of knots. You can do however many knots you want depending on the area you are filling in.

Here in how many knots we did per hanger:

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Now we just need to find plants we won’t kill in a week. Sigh. We have already gone through 2 sets of herbs so far. We may be crafty but we do not have green thumbs!!

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20190707_132228-1.jpgEDIT: These hangers have been up for almost 2 months now. We have gone though 2 set of herbs. We finally listened to all of you who commented and put those poor herbs in the back yard. Thank you! They are thriving. We now have shade loving plants and they look great!

Another concern from you all was that the copper was bending and may fall. This was not the case, but the slight bend didn’t look ideal. So we put the new plants in smaller pots which hold less soil. This kept the weight down and solved out problem

Thanks for everyone who sent feedback on this one! It helped us grow.

Not that you asked for it! But we do love to do a little photo shoot. So heres our new and improved after photos.Photo_1567215458543.jpg

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Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

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