Boho Black Out Blinds

I had every intention of doing this project on our master bedroom black out blinds. But as luck had it, someone left an old roll of white black out blinds right behind out house yesterday (I love our magical back alley!). So this project is a bit of a tester. Because so much of DIY is trial and error, I’m going to do this project on a throw away set of blinds and if it goes well I’ll redo it on our master bedroom ones later on.

A bit of backstory now that you know about my habits of picking up other peoples discarded belongings (which some might call garbage). When we moved into our home, the previous owners left all their window dressings. I really mean dressings, it was as if the house was getting ready to go to the fanciest of balls everyday! Unclear if they were vampires, but they certainly wanted absolutely no light to enter the house at any point! I really do hope they never read this blog! They not only had black out blinds on every window but they also had the heaviest ceiling to floor, wall to wall, drapes as well. We took down the drapes right away, but seeing as the house is old, and nothing was built to today’s regulation, we kept the blackout blinds. We didn’t want to have to have custom sized blinds made.

W4278858_13.jpg**They must have opened the black out blinds behind the curtains for this shot of the bedroom  You really had to look past the decor to see the potential for this house!** Fast forward a year later and I’ve had enough of these stark white blinds…but still don’t want to pay for new ones. So here is how I converted my stark white basic black out blinds to whimsical, soft, boho inspired window coverings. Remember my post from last week? Well this is where we are going to use those Natural Tea Dyed Pompoms. 

What you will need for this project:

–       Blackout blinds

–       Non bleached cheese cloth

–       Adhesive spray

–       Fabric scissors (or any scissors)

–       Trim, I used pompoms

–       Plastic gloves

–       Hot glue gun

Any size wood. We used 1x8x8 unfinished pine.png

Firstly you’ll want to remove the blinds from the wall and make sure you clean them. Nothing sticks well on a dirty surface. Once clean and dry, bring all your materials outside. You will not want to do this project inside. The spray adhesive will certainly not just land on your project and you definitely don’t want to inhale it.

Heres what I started with

Heres what I started with

Unroll and lay your blinds on the ground about 5 inches longer than they ever would be in your home- most blinds are made longer than you will need them for, so no need to do this on the entire length of the blinds, just on the length you will see. I did this in the back alley, but if you were doing it in your yard I would use a tarp to protect your ground/lawn.

Spray time! This adhesive dries really fast so be prepared with everything you need. Get your gloves on (things are gonna get sticky!) and spray your blinds from about 10 inches away making sure not to hold the nozzel in one place for too long, keep it moving! Once sprayed, immediately lay your cheese cloth. Start at the bottom and lightly brush out the wrinkles with your fingers. Move your way up until all the wrinkles are gone…Or most are gone! I found it dried so fast that I couldn’t make it the entire way. Once it was dry I sprayed the entire thing again and brushed out the remainder of the wrinkles until the entire thing was smooth. I then gave it a good once over spray and left it to dry. Make sure to do light layers of spray adhesive or it won’t dry properly.20200623_101631.jpg

Once fully dry you’ll go ahead with fabric or very sharp scissors, and carefully trim the excess cheese cloth from the edges of your blinds. You may need to spray after wards again to make sure none of your sides came up during the trimming.

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Once trimmed, measure to see how much trim you’ll need and cut 2 inches longer. It’s easier to trim excess off after instead of gluing it in the exact correct position.

Take your hot glue gun and add glue to the bottom edge, 5 inches at a time. Adhering the trim as you go. Only doing 5 inches at a time will help the glue stay hot until the fabric hits it and give you enough time to get it into the perfect position. Trim the overhand once fully dried.

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Let dry completely.

And finally hang!…Or in my case, redo the entire project on blinds that we can actually hang in our home. Haha.

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Enjoy!!

Yes, that's Matts hand holding it up so I can take a picture without installing the blinds!Yes, that’s Matts hand holding it up so I can take a picture without installing the blinds!

Tips:

*If you decide to not use cheese cloth and instead pick a different fabric, make sure that fabric is as thin as cheese cloth. If it’s too thick, the blinds will never roll up properly

*Don’t wear gloves when you’re using the hot glue gun, only when using the spray adhesive. If hot glue hits plastic gloves, it can melt the gloves to your finger and it will not feel good!

*Get creative and add as much or as little trim as you like. Or even go crazy and mix and match different patterns of trim.

*Use non bleached fabric for a warmer boho lookPS. How do you take pictures of blackout blinds?! Its so dark!PS. How do you take pictures of blackout blinds?! Its so dark!

If you try this project, make sure to tag us on instagram for a chance to be featured in our stories. @talldorkandmatching

As a blogger, our content includes affiliate links from advertisers. We may earn money from actions readers take on these links, such as a click and purchase. However, these are the tools that we recommend fully and have helped our blog tremendously

Gallery Wall “floating” Shelf

Keeping on our gallery wall theme. Here is how we made the “floating” shelf.20200506_115232.jpgWhat you will need for this project:

–       2 plywood storage boxes from the dollar store

–       2 planks of wood

–       Wood glue

–       Clamps

–       L shaped brackets and screws

–       Sander or sandpaper

–       Jig saw or drywall knife

–       Circular saw

–       Electric drill Any size wood. We used 1x8x8 unfinished pine.png1.     Prep your wood boxes and wood planks:

For the dollar store plywood boxes, you are going to want to remove the bottoms so they are just the 4 walls. For me, the bottom was in very tight so I made a hole in the bottom with a drywall knife and used my jigsaw to cut out some pieces to lessen the pressure. This allowed me to slide the bottom out.20190922_143830.jpgOnce you have your 4 walled box without a bottom you’ll want to sand it down until its smooth. 20190922_144009.jpgFor your wood planks you’ll want to cut them so they are the width of your boxes and a bit longer. I decided to add one boxes worth of length extra and split them up so we had extra space on both of the sides. Once cut, sand down any rough edges using an electric sander of sandpaper.20190922_153917.jpg·      If you are wanting to paint or stain your pieces, this would be the time to do that. We decided to leave ours natural as it esthetically made sense with our gallery wall.

1.     To make this a floating shelf you will want to hide your L shaped brackets behind the walls of the box. The best way to do this is lay your bottom piece of wood on a flat surface. Place the 2 plywood boxes in place and mark left and right behind the outside walls of the plywood boxes. While you are here, also mark where you want your boxes to be. Once marked, place the boxes to the side and attach the l brackets to the bottom wood plank. Note that they will still stick out a bit which will allow you to drill the into the wall easily. But make sure they stick out on the inside of the outside wall, so they are more hidden. 20190923_123019.jpg·      Put the brackets on the bottom so that the shelf can hold a bit more weight.

1.     Time to glue your boxes to your planks of wood. Use wood glue and using the guides you previously marked to attach the bottom plank to the box. Repeat this step for the top plank as well. Once they are both glued either clamp until dry or use something heavy on top to keep them in place until dry.20190923_123207.jpg20190923_123234.jpg20190923_123258.jpgOnce dry you can hang on the wall. You will want to either drill into studs or use anchors.

·      This is an ornamental shelf. Not a load bearing shelf. We use it for our crystals and some display objects. It would also be good for keys and wallets by the front door. But do not put a large amount of weight on it.

·      We have had ours up for a year now with no problems and it is home to about 10 crystals and stones, a beaver scull, a small vase, and 3 jars. 20190925_203414.jpg20200506_115213.jpgHave you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

As a blogger, our content includes affiliate links from advertisers. We may earn money from actions readers take on these links, such as a click and purchase. However, these are the tools that we recommend fully and have helped our blog tremendously

Baby Friendly Cord Box

This month is all about making our home more child friendly. I don’t want to say child proofing, cause we aren’t there just yet, but for sure more child friendly. The first thing we wanted to do was contain all the TV, internet, Xbox cords. They are very appealing for baby C and to be honest, they are a bit of an eye sore. Our first attempt to deter her was to put a cushion in front of the area….

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Clearly that didn’t work! So here’s what we did instead.

What you will need for this project:

– Brad nailer and brad nails

– Wood glue

– Clamps

– Table saw

– ½ inch thick plywood

– ¼ inch thick particle board (or hardboard or MDF)

-Drill

-Measuring tape

-Pencil

-Chalk paint

-Roller

– Chalk paint brush

– Chalk paint sealer spray

-Sand paper

what we started withWhat we started with

Firstly we measured the space we needed to conceal and the electronics we needed to hide from our babies curious eyes. We wanted to make a 3 sided box so the back was open for all the cords to go back, as well as provide some ventilation for the devices that get a bit warm.

Matt started by cutting the 2 sides of the box out of the ½ inch plywood and then the front and bottom out of the 1/4 inch particle board. This is ideal so that he had all his pieces of wood cut before he started assembling.

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Rather than simply nailing everything together, he wanted to use a technique he recently learned at his woodworking class called a rabbet joint. A rabbet joint is an open-sided recess along the edge or across the end of a board or panel. (so thankful for adult night classes!). Rather than just use a butt joint (where the one board butts into the other one), this joint adds a bit more surface area to the joint for more glue (or nails), and is a bit nicer to look at! Here is the process:

Firstly lets talk about the side 2 panels – the ½ inch plywood. Matt wanted to do a ¼ inch rabbet joint, so the ¼ inch hardboard will sit flush with the edge of the sides. He started measuring how much of a channel he wanted to achieve on the front edge and bottom edge of the 2 side panels. Firstly he set the guard measurement on the table saw just under ¼ inch so that the far edge of the blade is at the quarter inch mark.

Photo_1573757574252.jpgHe removed the guard on the table saw and lowered the blade so it was only a ¼ inch high using ¼ inch boards to confirm his measurements. (make sure to unplug before you do this!). Once the blade was in place he ran the front and bottom of the side panels through the table saw creating a groove. Repeat this on both side pieces on the bottom and front side.

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You will be left with about 3/16 inch of wood on the outer rim of the channels where your made the groove. You are going to want to remove them to create a full groove on the edge. Matt moved the guard over to about the 1/8thinch mark and repeated the process a couple times until there is a nice open channel. He repeated this on both sides of the box, both the bottom edge and front side. He used a flat chisel after to get any little bits out that he missed with the saw.

Photo_1573757585735.jpgHe now has 4 joints ready to be assembled! The front and bottom pieces will now nicely fit into those grooves! Hurray! He wood glued around the edges on the inside of the joints, and applied the clamps to secure while drying.

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At least in a perfect world that’s what he would have done. However our clamps weren’t long enough. So to add strength to the box he used the brad-nailer around the edges to secure the joints once the glue had dried.

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Now we wanted something slightly more aesthetically pleasing but not so much that baby C was also interested in it. In addition, we wanted to add some more breathability to the box so it would properly ventilate. We decided drilling a pattern into the front would give it more appeal and also add the much needed ventilation. Matt decided on an x design and drilled 9 holes in that pattern.

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He also added a few drill holes on the side as needed for the cords that wouldn’t reach to go through.

He then painted the box with chalk paint to match a few of our other décor items and not draw much attention to it. He sealed it with acrylic chalk paint sealer.

*If you can’t find the color chalk paint you want. Pop over here to find out how to make your own!

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And here we have our finished product!

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Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a chance to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

Tree Branch Bedroom Lighting

Back one day when we didn’t live together and had to do the whose-house-shall-we-stay-at dance (Matt always won because he had a dog). Abby was on her way over one day and stumbled along a long dried out branch on the side of the road. As she does, she brought it inside and waited for inspiration to strike. And as usual, that branch was propped up against the wall for close to a year, a move, and countless other completed projects.

Photo_1568218460097.jpgAfter we moved in together, our new place was short on space, so we did a DIY Ikea hack on our nightstands to maximize space (tutorial for another time!) but didn’t want to waste precious table top space on lights….This is how the branch finally found its calling!

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Things you’ll need for this project:

–      Branch

–      2 basic pendant lights

–      2 light cages

–      2 Edison bulbs

–      Spray paint – We used Rustoleum in Metallic Satin bronze

–      Painters tape

–      Rope

–      Scissors

–      Hook

–      Anchor

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We started by spray painting the metal part of the pendent light. We protected the cord by wrapping it in painters tape and did 3 light coats of spray paint. We liked the gold as it tied in the golden handles on the nightstands we had.

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Once dried, we added the cage to the pendant. There should be instructions on your cage but basically you just loosen the screws on the cage, slide the cage onto the pendant, and secure in place by tightening the screws back up. Easy!

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We then hung the branch by tying rope to both sides of the branch. We did 2 basic knots and tied the excess rope off so it didn’t stick out. Once it’s tied and hung you can rotate the rope a bit to hide the knot behind the branch. The most important thing is that it’s secure. Speaking of secure…You will want to hang the rope on a hook that is in an anchor so it is very secure in your wall. You do not want this falling on your head while you sleep!!

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Once it was secure, we wrapped the pendant cords around the branch, and voila, a space saving rustic tree branch light.

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Photo_1568218463244.jpgWhat we learned from this project:

  • Originally we didn’t want to have the cages. We wanted just the exposed Edison bulbs. When we hung it up, it looked great! However they get real hot and damaged our headboard a bit. If you plan to have the bulbs rest against anything, consider the cage. If you are going to have the branch suspended from the ceiling then exposed bulbs without the cages would look amazing!

Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

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Up-cycled leather dining room chairs

Abby here again! Hello!

One fine day in the Tall Dork and Matching home, baby C and Matt were taking a nap and I was lazily searching the internet. Until I saw these gems being tossed on a local freebie page on FB and had to have them!

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I jumped into our bed shocking Matt awake. I mischievously told him I had to go run an errand and he knew what that grin meant: we were getting more free junk for the garage. Not this time Matt!!! These beauties were getting up-cycled asap.

If you read in our previous post, we had recently mixed up a beautiful stormy blue batch of homemade chalk paint and dip dyed our dining table with it. But that’s as far as we have gotten in the dining area. A table. We knew we wanted to do a built in bench around 2 sides of the table and we have a high chair, so we only needed 2 chairs. Lucky find I guess.

Heres our lonely dining room tableHere’s our lonely dining room table

Now these chairs weren’t in ideal condition. The legs were rusty, both chairs had paint, marker, and pen on them as well as a few minor rips. But I could see past it! These chairs were going to be so handsome

We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.

We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.

Things you’ll need for this project:

 – Otter oil – or some sort of leather conditioner

– Chalk paint

– Brush

– Cloths for cleaning

– Chair leg caps

– Hair spray

– Soap

– Magic eraser

– Crazy glue

– Electric drill or a screw driver

First thing was to clean these chairs and take them apart

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For the leather I firstly cleaned it with soap and water. That managed to dissolve most of the paint. Then I attacked the marker with the magic eraser (which I soaked in soap and water for an added kick) and it worked miracles! I scrubbed away at the pen but just couldn’t get it out.

My day job is as a hairdresser and I had read online that hairspray works for this sort of thing. So I was optimistic. I sprayed directly to the penned area (not like you would apply it to hair!) then scrubbed it out with the magic eraser. I won’t say that it completely worked, but it did dull it quite a bit! Thank you trunk full of hair product!

Now make sure after every step where you are using anything abrasive to condition the leather. It can dry and crack pretty easily. So after every scrub I applied otter oil which also helped with the stains.

For the legs I first removed the leg caps. They were nice, but were missing a few so I decided just to replace them all. They are basically just big thumb tacks attached to the leg so they came off pretty easily with a few wacks of the back of a hammer.

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Then I sanded the rust off of the legs with the sander – heres a tutorial on removing rust for more details

Once everything was clean, smooth, dry, and conditioned I brought them inside to paint. I wanted to make sure I painted all the way to the bottom and had no paint build up so I propped up the legs using cutlery. This was a great way to elevate the legs enough to not have paint pooling at the bottom.

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I painted the handles as well but it was hard as they don’t really sit still on anything. So I did a rough job for now, but more on that later.

I did 3 coats of paint then 3 coats of water based poly – waiting the appropriate time between coats to dry fully.

Photo_1567215325137.jpgOnce everything was dry, I reassembled the chairs. Screwing the legs and handle back on.

It was much easier at this point to take a small brush and carefully paint the handles now that they were steadily attached. I managed to only get a little drop on the leather, but it’s chalk paint so was super easy to clean up.

I crazy glued the leg caps to the legs and let them dry.

We are getting so much closer to having a finished dining room!!!

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Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

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Dip Dye Dining Room

The first project we did with the DIY chalk paint was create a dip dyed look for our Ikea Backaryd table legs and Slahult table top.

We had been looking for a while for a dining room table and couldn’t find anything we liked in any price range. So, as we do, we decided to hack something together to create the perfect fit for our home.Before  We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.Before

We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.

 Things you’ll need for this project:

Matt assembled the table legs as much as he could without putting the screws in (in order to not have to paint the screws as well. This is ideal for a couple reasons:

1.     If you paint over your screws you run the risk of not being able to disassemble that piece of furniture again if you get paint in the crevasses, or fuse the screw to the furniture.

2.     It creates a nice aesthetic to have the shiny screws contrast with the chalk paint.

Once it was set up, we placed the legs on a large piece of flat cardboard to protect the floors (you can use a drop cloth or do it outside) and started taping off the area we wanted to keep white.

Abby started by measuring how far from the ground we wanted the paint to start and stuck on a piece of tape to mark the spot. For ours we did just under 7 inches from the floor. That means the diagonal pieces will have a bit more length of white showing but will appear the same length as the other legs.

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You’ll want to then tape off the entire area that will be staying white to ensure clean lines at the transition point and that no paint drips on the white area.

Photo_1567262058325.jpgWe used our Chalk paint and a roller brush. We did 3 very thin coats of the paint everywhere that wasn’t taped off.

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Once dried we applies 3 coats of water based polyurethane to the legs. This is going to be a high traffic area with little feet kicking away at the table legs and underside. We wanted to make it as indestructible as possible.

Isn’t he a hunk?!Isn’t he a hunk?!

We reassembled and were ready to go! Now to find some dining room chairs so we can actually sit at our new table!

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Things we learned from this project:

–       For a smoother finish use a roller or sponge brush. We started with a bristle brush and it was way too streaky

–       For clean lines on your dip dye full your paint off in the direction away from the painted area. This will help any paint that is connected to both the tape and the table will hopefully break off and stay on the table vs breaking off with the tape.

–       We painted the bottom of the table as well. Why? Well, we thought it would look classy. Turns out it doesn’t look like anything at all because you can’t see it! If you lay on the floor and look up it looks great!  But lets’ be honest, how often are you laying under your dining room table?!

Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

As a blogger, our content includes affiliate links from advertisers. We may earn money from actions readers take on these links, such as a click and purchase. However, these are the tools that we recommend fully and have helped our blog tremendously

Gold Leaf Ikea Hatten Table Hack

The best part about our new home is the back alley. Not only does that mean we have back access to our garage, where we do most of our work, but people use it to get rid of old junk (new junk for us!). Because it’s not on a main street, we get first dibs on all that garbage just waiting to be upcycled! 

We came across this Ikea Hatten side table, it was filled with murky water and the legs were rusted up. We had been searching for a side table for Cs nursery and this was perfect.

 We really wanted a flat table, so we’d need to fill in the empty space to level it out. We love the aesthetic of wood and we already wanted to add a bit of gold interest to match C’s room aesthetic, and this is what we came up with!

 First thing first, this table needed to be cleaned! Like heavy-duty plastic gloves, and multiple washes kind of cleaning. 

So this is what we started with:

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Sorry all, we forgot to take a before picture so we just got this off the internet. Use your imagination and imagine it was dragged through a swamp: dirty, yellowed and with really rusted up legs.

After it was all clean it was time to disassemble…..and clean some more.

 Once all the pieces were clean, we started on the legs. We had to get rid of the rust first before we went any further. We could have painted over it but we wanted this table to last. Heres a link to how we got rid of the rust  

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Things you will need for this project:

–      A Hatten ikea table (or another table with a similar style)

–      Spray paint for legs and base- We used Rustoleum on the legs and chalk paint on the plastic top

–      Gold leaf sheets 

–      Epoxy Resin

–      Linseed oil and soft cloth 

–      1” thick wood

–      Gorilla wood glue

–      A disposable container to mix resin in (we used an old plastic wipes container)

–      Wooden paint-mixing stick (usually free from your local hardware shop)

–      Mask

–      Gloves

–      Protective eye wear 

–      A level 

–      Jig Saw

–      Sander 

–      Clamps

–      Something heavy (we used a brick)

We then sprayed the top of the table, making sure to take the top off and spray inside too. As its transparent, we wanted it to look good from the inside and outside.

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We then sprayed the top of the table, making sure to take the top off and spray inside too. As it’s transparent, we wanted it to look good from the inside and outside.

Now to for the real work! We wanted to add texture and interest to the top of the table while leveling it out. 

Firstly we had some extra scrap wood from my squatty potty (add link) projects that were already in rounded pieces and 1” thick which is the exact depth we needed to fill. We measured the inside of the opening of the table, and used that measurement to determine the size of the piece of wood needed. We ended up using 2 half circles and a centre piece to make the perfect shape. We prefer to use scraps but if you have a solid piece, you can use that instead of these extra steps.

We used gorilla glue and clamped the 3 pieces together and waited 24 hours to dry fully.

Once dried we clamped the wood circle to our work bench and used to jig saw to smooth out any imperfections.

Imperfections

Wood Clamp and Jigsaw

Once it was a smooth circle, we kept the round clamped and sanded the surface to smooth out the side that would be exposed.Sanding

Once smooth we applied some Linseed oil with a soft cloth to brighten the wood back up and bring out the knots, texture and imperfections that make wood so beautiful!

Linseed oil application

Once the circular piece of wood was all polished up we applied a generous amount of gorilla glue to the bottom and placed it in the centre of the table top.

Gorilla glue applicationWe put a brick on top so it dried flush and in place.

Photo_1567213594989.jpgOnce fully dried, we made sure to clean out the top of any debris that had settled over the 24 hours we let dry.

Now for the resin, this was a perfect project for our first resin pour. Because it was to have gold leaf inside it we didn’t have to worry too much about bubbles and keeping it clear. Before you start, please wear gloves, a mask and protective eye wear. 

We still mixed 1 to 1 (follow directions on the bottle) and mixed for 3 minutes very slowly with a wooden paint-mixing stick. You don’t want it frothy! 

Once its mixed you can pour it into the empty space first, and once filled, pour some on top of the wood and rim of the table to make sure the table top is leveled. You have around 15 minutes to play around before it starts hardening so no need to rush this. 

Now to add the gold leaf, you can add any amount you like depending on your desired effect. For us, we wanted to slightly blur the lines created from the wood so we focused mostly on that area. We ripped and sprinkled the gold leaf over the resin and used a the wooden paint-mixer to move them around until we had them in the positions we wanted.  

Let the resin dry for at least 72 hours before you start to use the table

Enjoy!

After

Things we learned from this projects/What we would have done differently:

–      Just because you’re using a table top for your project doesn’t mean its level! We learnt this the hard way. We were using our work bench as the surface when we poured the resin. When we went back to check on it after it had dried, we realized it had settled unevenly because the table itself was uneven. We slanted it slightly the other way and re-poured a bit to balance it out. If we were to do it again, we would use a level and balance it out before the first pour. Resin is self leveling and does not lie! 

–      Bubbles! Although we didn’t care if it had some smaller bubbles (as it adds interest to the texture of the piece). We found when we went to check on it 15 minutes later there were little areas about the size of a quarter where little bubbles had risen up. Thankfully we got to them before the resin dried and were able to pop them with the paint stick. Would have been so sad had they dried like that! It was not a good look. 

Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

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Grandmas Beanbag Chair

While we were pregnant with baby C we had 3 of our grandparents pass away. Beyond naming her after all 3 of them, we are always looking for ways to instil their memory in C. So when Abby went back home to Vancouver to help pack up her grandma’s home after she passed, she found these two gorgeous fringed circular tablecloths. We knew we had to make something for Cs already pretty fringy room these this find.

Before  We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.Before

We have attached affiliate links at the end of this post at no additional charge to you. We will earn a commission when you link though and purchase.

What you will need for this project:

– 2 pieces of the same sized fabric

– A sewing machine/a lot of patience/ or a very kind sister who will sew for you!

– Zipper

– Needle and thread that match your fabric, or doesn’t match, depending on your aesthetic

– Stitch ripper, for all your mistakes. We learn from our mistakes so don’t be afraid to make them! We make them ALL THE TIME!

– Sewing pins

– All the bean bag filler you can find! We used 3 large bags

Photo_1567215706428.jpgNow, fabric and sewing is not a strong skill for either of us so we outsourced the sewing part to Abby’s sister. She simply used her sewing machine to sew a tight stitch around the perimeter of the 2 cloths leaving about 8 inches open to add a zipper and beanbag filler later.

I got this image off a quick google search, it shows what I’m trying to explain above!

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Now that Abby’s sister had done all the hard work, it was time for us to do the messy work! Pouring those bean bags was no easy task, but we managed.

After the bag was full, Abby hand-sewed the zipper around the opening, making sure to keep the stitches very close together so no beans could sneak out.

To ensure it is fully sealed up, do the shake test. That’s right, shake that bean bag in every direction and see if any little beans fall out.  ♪♪♪♪Shake shake shake, shake shake shake, shake your bean bag, shake your bean bag♪♪♪♪!!

Now plonk that hard working butt of yours down and enjoy your new chair!

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Things we learned from this projects/What we would have done differently:

-the pouring of the beans is a 2 person job! Be prepared for a mess. These bad boys are staticky! We found the vacuum worked best for clean up as our hands just moved them around and increased our mess.

-You need way more beans than you think! We only bought one large bag to begin with but ended up having to use 3!

-We probably would have used a bigger zipper if we were better at using the sewing machine – this would have made it easier to pour the beans in.

Have you tried this project? Tag us on Instagram for a change to be featured in our stories! @talldorkandmatching

As a blogger, our content includes affiliate links from advertisers. We may earn money from actions readers take on these links, such as a click and purchase. However, these are the tools that we recommend fully and have helped our blog tremendously